Worth a Share

Found this neat personality profile/test/inventory over on Lucky Otter’s Haven the other day and decided to give it a go.

Here’s the link to the test if anyone is interested in taking it: http://www.yourpersonality.net/npi/npi4.pl

Below are my personal results. I actually scored lower than I anticipated, because I know there are days and moods where I exhibit narcissistic traits, especially when I’m triggered or threatened. Although, perhaps they’re not actually narcissistic if I’m aware of them and able to control them, and instead a natural defense mechanism. Which is basically what narcissism IS, in basic terms. An overtly exaggerated defense to neglect or abuse… hmm… Now I’m curious. lol.

Varieties of Narcissism
According to Greek mythology, Narcissus was a young man who was renowned for his beauty. He was exceptionally proud and disdained those who expressed an interest in him. The goddess Nemesis observed Narcissus’ behavior and decided to punish him. One day while walking in the forest, Narcissus became thirsty and went to drink from a stream. As he saw his reflection, he fell in love with it, not knowing that it was him. As he bent down to kiss it, it seemed to “run away” and he was heartbroken. He grew thirstier but he wouldn’t touch the water for fear of damaging his reflection, so he eventually died of thirst while staring at his own reflection.You completed three questionnaires that are designed to measure narcissistic tendencies: the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI), the Narcissistic Admiration and Rivalry Questionnaire (NARQ), and the Narcissistic Personality Inventory(NPI). By completing all three of these measures, it should be possible for you to get a better understanding of how narissistic you are and, importantly, whether different measures agree in their assessment of your personality. We summarize your results below.


The Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI)

The NPI measures several distinct facets of Narcissism. Your overall score was 6 on a scale ranging from 0 to 40. The NPI assesses various facets of narcissism. We summarize three of the major facets below, along with your scores for each of them.

Your score on leadership is 4
You scored at the 34 th percentile on this subscale of the NPI. This means that 34 % of the people who have filled out this questionnaire to date have scores lower than yours. Leadership refers to a person’s leadership skills and power. People who score higher on authority like to be in charge. On the extreme ends of this trait, they like to gain power for power’s sake alone.

Your score on vanity is 0.
You scored at the 7 th percentile on the vanity subscale of the NPI. This means that 7 % of the people who have filled out this questionnaire to date have scores lower than yours. This trait refers to a person’s vanity–excessive pride in or admiration of one’s own appearance or achievements.

Your score on exhibitionism/entitlement is 0
You scored at the 11 th percentile on this subscale of the NPI. This means that 11 % of the people who have filled out this questionnaire to date have scores lower than yours. Exhibitionism refers to a person’s need to be the center of attention, and willingness to ensure they are the center of attention. At the extreme high end of this trait a person may try to become the center of attention at the expense of other’s needs. Entitlement refers to the extent to which people feel that the world owes them favorable treatment or the extent to which people feel that they have a right to something (e.g., praise, recognition, attention).


Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI)

One of the narcissism questionnaires you took was the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (NPI). The PNI comes from the clinical tradition of conceptualizing narcissism. It assess two pathological components of narcissism: grandiosity and vulnerability.

Your score on grandiosity is 6.
You scored at the 0.5 th percentile on this subscale of the PNI. This means that 0.5 % of the people who have filled out this questionnaire to date have scores lower than yours.

Grandiosity comprises three traits: exploitativeness, grandiose fantasy, and self-sacrificing self-enhancement. Exploitativeness refers to a person’s tendency to manipulate others. On the extreme high end of this trait people find it easy to talk their way out of things and have no scruples about influencing others into doing what they want them to do.

Grandiose fantasy refers to a person’s need to fantasize about being admired and accomplishing special things. On the extreme high end of this trait people constantly fantasize about being admired, respected, and famous. They also fantasize about having an impact on the world around them and performing heroic deeds. Self-sacrificing self-enhancement refers to a person’s tendency to help others in order to enhance their self-image. On the extreme high end of this trait people help others and make personal sacrifices for the benefit of others under the pretense of sincere altruism while their real goal is to maintain and enhance their inflated self-image. Helping others makes them feel important and better than the person receiving help.

Your score on vulnerability is 1.
You scored at the 1.8 th percentile on this subscale of the PNI. This means that 1.8 % of the people who have filled out this questionnaire to date have scores lower than yours.

Vulnerability comprises four traits: entitlement rage, contingent self-esteem, hiding the self, and devaluing. Entitlement rage refers to a person’s tendency to feel angry when they do not get what they think they deserve. On the extreme high end of this trait people feel very annoyed when they do not get the attention, admiration, and respect that they expect from others. They also get angry when they are criticized or do not get what they want from others. Contingent self-esteem refers to fluctuations in a person’s self-esteem that depend on the attention and recognition the person receives from others. On the extreme high end of this trait people only feel good about themselves when they receive attention, admiration, and acknowledgment from others. When they feel unnoticed or disliked, they feel worthless and bad about themselves.

Hiding the self refers to a person’s need to hide their faults and needs from others. On the extreme high end of this trait people feel anxious and ashamed when others notice their needs. They try to do everything on their own because they see it as a weakness to ask for help and rely on others. Devaluing refers to a person’s tendency to avoid people out of fear of being disappointed. On the extreme high end of this trait people feel ashamed for needing recognition from others. They avoid people when they are afraid that their expectations will not be met and they will not receive acknowledgment.


Narcissistic Admiration and Rivalry Questionnaire (NARQ)

One of the narcissism questionnaires you took was the Narcissistic Admiration and Rivalry Questionnaire (NARQ). The NARQ assesses narcissism as a normal personality trait. The two main components assessed by the NARQ are admiration and rivalry.

Your score on Admiration is 6 out of 45.

Admiration refers to a person’s need to be admired by others and to be the center of attention. Admiration also refers to whether a person views himself or herself as great, special, and better than others. People on the extreme high end of this trait tend to seek high levels of praise, attention, and admiration from others. They show self-assured and charming behaviors and feel that they have a right to favorable treatment. People high on admiration engage in fantasies of being very popular, beautiful, and powerful.

Your score on Rivalry is 4 out of 45.

Rivalry refers to a person’s need to defend his or her overly positive self-views against real or imagined threats such as criticism, failure, or a lack of attention. On the extreme high end of this trait people show a general disregard for the needs and feelings of others. Their derogatory attitudes towards other people are reflected by hostile and aggressive behaviors. They show annoyed and spiteful reactions when other people are successful and the center of attention.


We hope you enjoyed using this application, and that you’ve learned something interesting about your personality. To learn more about research and theory on narcissism, please visit  Wikipedia’s entry.

For more free personality, relationship, and attitude tests, please visit yourPersonality.net


This page was designed by R. Chris Fraley at the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois for educational purposes.

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